Wednesday, November 29, 2006

unplugging, voluntarily and not

Verizon just told me there's a "delay" in hooking the DSL into my phone line at the new place. Arg. I hate being without internet at home. Actually, if I hang out perched in the front windowsill, I can scam some wifi off the neighbors, but that's not really a comfortable place to do much, you know. I might have to become one of those creepy people who rents a van and drives 5mph around the neighborhood pirating signals. And wearing an eye patch.

I am, however, slowly weening myself off television. With the tivo I would program whatever new show hit the airwaves into my "season pass." But the truth is, I never used to watch tv. I didn't watch it growing up, I didn't watch it in college. Only a Buffy marathon five Thanksgivings ago got me watching anything on a regular basis. So, when I stop watching, I find I just don't miss it. Of course, I'm going to have to buy a damn tivo anyway (and by "buy" I mean they're pretty much free everywhere), because Heroes is my new Buffy, and I CAN NOT miss it while I'm in India. God damn, that show is so effing good. Also, Battlestar Galactica. BUT THAT'S IT! I swear. I'm unplugging. Most of the time. (With an eye patch.)

My plan is to start reading again. Sometime during law school I totally stopped reading real books. Like, books that weighed less than 50lbs and didn't contain treatises on Antitrust laws (though, that was a good one!). I have maybe a handful of novels I finished during those three years, and each one took me literally months to finish. No more! I'm removing the self-imposed bookstore ban (from when I continued to buy books all the time and just not read them). Though I never do this, I actually bought a book in the National airport on my way to Cali earlier this month. It was The Time-Traveler's Wife (I liked the cover), and you know what, it was really good. Technically it's a love story, but the guy actually time travels, and it's believable. The author could have written it a million different ways, too, and so you spend a lot of time thinking about why she chose to write this part before that part, and also just pausing to think about how Future Husband is affecting Past Husband's life. It's really quite good. And made me cry. On the metro. Yeesh.

I left work early last Friday and went over to Borders. God. Bookstores are like magical castles. I always feel like I'm walking in to Disneyland. Where to go first?? New releases? Political? Reference?? (Christ, I have a huge weakness for reference books. I'm not even kidding. For Christmas a few years ago my mom bought me a ginormous Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. I love it like a child.) I had seven books in my hand within twenty minutes. I whittled it down to three, though. (And was disappointed to see they had maps for every country in the world except India. Lame.)

So, I finally picked up Confessions of an Economic Hitman, which Chai has been encouraging me to read (and is, so far, really good). I also picked up Namesake, about an Indian family that emigrates to the U.S. There were no less than three books in the small section of new fiction releases that were about Indian families. And I also picked up a reference book (naturally) on travel writing, just to pick up a few tips and learn some more about pitching stories. I've started reading before bedtime again every night, and hope to gear up to the point I used to be at, voraciously reading through my collection; not mindlessly watching another Law & Order marathon.

What about movies, you say? Don't see Babel. Unless you need some inspiration to slit your wrists because life is nothing but a series of intersecting disappointments and utter tragedies for everyone on the planet. That is all.

1 Comments:

At 1:15 PM, November 29, 2006, Blogger Kelly said...

I loved The Time-Traveler's Wife. It's really the first book I've read in a long time that stuck with me and that I could honestly say that I loved at the end of it. It seems like all books were like that when I was younger, but I guess I've become more discerning. That sounds better than I've become a snob.

 

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